Patrick Buchanan: What Trump will leave in Biden’s inbox | Columns

Dismissing President Donald Trump’s claim that the 2020 election remains undecided, Joe Biden has begun to name his national security team. Right now, it looks Democratic establishment all the way. Biden’s urgency in naming his foreign policy team is understandable. For if his election is confirmed by the Electoral College, then he will find himself on Jan. 20 with a lineup of foreign policy crises. First is Afghanistan. While a Beltway battle has erupted over the wisdom of Trump’s decision to cut in half — to 2,500 — the number…

Biden’s possible defense secretary advocates flawed approach to China | Letters to the Editor

Joe Biden is the president-elect of the United States of America.   And it looks like Michele Flournoy will be the secretary of defense. This should worry those who believe in a world defined by international law, peace, and a non-militaristic policy.   The rise of China has drawn much attention from foreign policy thinkers and arms control advocates over the past several years. She served in prior Democratic administrations and gave us a picture of what her China policy might look like in her recent essay, “How to Prevent a War in…

The UK military’s overseas base network inv…

The runway is in need of costly repairs, and Britain’s secretive spy agency GCHQ has a significant presence there at Cat Hill. In total there appear to be five UK military and intelligence sites on Ascension, including accommodation at Travellers Hill and married quarters at Two Boats and George Town.  The US air force and National Security Agency operate alongside the UK personnel on the island, a relationship mirrored in the United States where 730 Britons are spread throughout the country. Many of them are clustered in US military command…

GDP impact of South China Sea disputes

The South China Sea, increasingly a hotspot of conflict between China and the US, is the subject of several overlapping territorial disputes. Like in most geopolitical tensions, trade would be a prime casualty in case of an escalation. And, as a new study finds, the consequences could be severe. Major trading economies in the Asia-Pacific region could suffer an average GDP loss of over 12% if an escalation blocks shipping via key waterways in the region, finds the study by Kerem Coşar and Benjamin Thomas of the University of Virginia.…